WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

Schedule Design Changes in WordPress

Wall of clocks | time to build a WordPress site

One of my favorite recent changes to WordPress is the ease of scheduling design changes. I admit that while I find this feature very cool, I don’t use it a lot. But if you’re the kind of person who like to mark holidays, sales, or something else with customizations to look of your WordPress site, you should really know about this amazing power of the WordPress Customizer. It’ll really change the game if you’ve never used it before.




Coding Advice for Those Who Think They Suck at Code

Found from Ben in the MasterWP newsletter, I love this hilariously short bit of advice about how to be a better programmer. In it, Pete Shirley, who calls himself “a poor programmer” says it’s helped him as someone who thinking they’re in the bottom quartile of all programmers. I kind of doubt he really is, because the advice is way better that what a lot of “elite” programmers tell you about. And it’s very approachable.


PHP Foreach: All You Need to Know

One of the most-used functions in my life with PHP is foreach. Partly, this is because it’s just an exquisitely named function, and it maps well to how I think. Partly this is because it’s kind of the backbone of a webpage: iterate through a set of things, operating on some selectively, and then display them all.


How to Change Your Permalink Settings

When you create a new page or post on your site, WordPress automatically creates a new entity called a “permalink” that directs to your new content. Since search engines use the URLs of your links as a factor to to determine your position in their rankings, making sure they’re optimized to reflect your keywords is pretty important. In this post, we’ll walk you through how to customize your permalink structure. Luckily, it’s pretty managable to change permalink settings in WordPress!


Justin Tadlock Joins WP Tavern

Back in 2007, when I was just coming to terms with WordPress, Justin Tadlock was out at the forefront of what I understood WordPress to be. In the (gosh!) 12 years since, Justin’s stayed busy in the WordPress space, but also done some other things like share on his blog about his small farm.


WP Cron in Practice: wp_schedule_event Examples + More

A few weeks ago we talked about what “cron jobs” were in WordPress and beyond. That tutorial about what “WordPress scheduled tasks” are hopefully gave you a good understanding of some of the things that you might do with them. Today we’ll instead focus on how you’ll use wp_schedule_event to actually do them. That is, we’ll cover a number of WordPress cron job examples.


How to Migrate a WordPress Site with the Duplicator Plugin

WordPress has a lot of migration systems. We’ve had lots of good experiences with All-in-One WP Migration, some people swear by WP Migrate DB Pro, and others are partial to WP-CLI’s terminal-based systems. On top of these options, I’ve recently found a plugin I really like called Duplicator that approaches WordPress migrations in a unique way. Here’s a guide on how to use Duplicator, and what sets it apart.


Install WordPress with a Managed Database on Digital Ocean

Digital Ocean, a popular VPS hosting provider, recently announced a hosted-MySQL platform. The reasons you may want to do use this (vs putting the MySQL instance on the same server as your WordPress wed server) are a little more subtle than I want to get into here, but suffice it to say you’d get better scalability but a possibly more complex setup. For that reason, I’m linking to this tutorial on the topic from Mark Drake.