WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

Move a WordPress Site with the Duplicator Plugin

There are a lot of migration systems for WordPress. We’ve had lots of good experiences with All-in-One WP Migration. Some people swear by WP Migrate DB Pro. Others are partial to WP-CLI’s terminal-based systems. One of the few tools I’d never tried was Duplicator, but I recently did and I love it. I was very pleasantly surprised about a specific facet of it: I don’t need WordPress to get a new local copy of a remote WordPress site running on my local machine. You just pull down two files, put them in the same folder, and then you’re set. It’s great!




Understanding is_singular in WordPress Templates

Let’s talk about is_singular, one of WordPress’s more complicated template tags. In WordPress themes (and plugins too), we use “conditional tags” to control what shows up. This Quick Guides explains how to use the is_singular conditional tag in WordPress, as well the two other related ones: is_page and is_single. As you might guess, they all tell use something about whether or not there is one piece of WordPress content. If it is (a) singular piece of content 🤓






SecurityCheckli.st

While yesterday’s story about security was just about common *WordPress* security issues, today I want to share a cool site that helps you more with overall personal security planning. It’s got one of those cutesy URLs: SecurityCheckli.st. But other than that, there’s a lot to recommend the site. Primarily: it lists all the tools you should know about if you’re trying to be holistically security conscious in all areas of your life. And they’re all presented in a clear context with a simple and elegant design.


Common WordPress Security Issues & How to Secure Your Site

Last night I was invited to speak at the Boulder WordPress meetup. My friend Angela drew a big crowd, and they listened intently to me talking a little too long about WordPress security vulnerabilities and what you can do to protect your WordPress site. That talk, like this article, is focused on protecting WordPress users and site-owners from common security problems. I have a whole other course about what WordPress developers should do to keep WordPress secure. This article will intentionally simplify complex technical details which often just cloud the story of security from a WordPress site owners perspective. There are far too many complex acronyms for WordPress security conversations to make sense easily to most non-developers.