WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

A GitHub Action to Deploy to the Plugin Repo

Deploying a WordPress plugin to the WordPress.org repository has been challenging for most developers for at least a few years. Why? Mostly because almost no one learns Subversion (the version control system that WordPress.org uses) anymore. So we’ve all cobbled together different versions of things that kind of work. And at least for me, I often forget what mine is, and how to use it. (For those real nerdy folks, what I have used a variation of Scribu’s scripts: http://scribu.net/blog/deploying-from-git-to-svn.html. It works for me, but I wouldn’t really recommend it as the perfect system. It’s just good enough that I’ve not sought an alternative.)


WordPress’s get_template_part() function: What and Why

This article introduces an important concept in WordPress themes: the WordPress get_template_part function. It’s one of the many important concepts of WordPress theme development. Mastering WordPress theme development is an important milestone in understanding WordPress development more generally. (We have a full free course on the topic, check it out.)


How to Remove the Date from a WordPress Post URL

So, you want to remove the date from your WordPress post URLs? I get it. Those /2016/07/09/post-slug URLs that seemed pretty cool when you (or someone else) set it up get old. The primary reason: when you update that post, what should you do? Leave it’s URL looking old? Move it to the new one and worry it’ll break. These concerns are why we use the “Post name” option for WordPress permalinks here at WPShout and encourage most of our clients to do the same.


Sarah Drasner on Learning to Learn

This is one of those articles that I’m linking 50% for its substance (which I regard as good but too brief) and 50% for covering and important topic. Specifically, how to manage and think about self-education. A lot, probably most, web developers I know and readers of WPShout I’ve talked to are self-educated in the web development field. Maybe you got college degrees, but few of those were “computer science.” Even if you did, Computer Science Degree often covers very little about web development. So most of us are just learning as we go.



The Four Languages You Must Know to Understand WordPress

WordPress Programming Language Book

Learning WordPress development starts with a lot of key questions, including this one: “What language is WordPress written in?” Another common one is “Should I learn PHP or JavaScript first?” WordPress programming languages is a big topic, but we’ll cover all you need to get started.


How to Create a WordPress Dynamic Front Page

So, you want to not have your ten most recent blog posts on your front page in WordPress? “Dynamic front page,” “custom home page,” and “WordPress static front page template” all kind of mean this same thing: I want to better control the marketing message that my WordPress site presents on the homepage. That’s our goal in this quick guide—to teach you the meaning of the “WordPress blog page template.” We’ll need that for this process, in addition to learning how to set your static home page.


Paths to Learning Web Development

Back in November I set aside this article from my friend Jeremy Ward about how to learn web development. I finally got to reading it and quite liked it. So I thought I’d share it with you. I liked that Jeremy started off with something I think about to little. The “circles of knowledge.” Here’s what he says:



An Introduction to PHP Web Scraping

Over at Thoughtful Code, I recently published an introduction to PHP web scraping based on some hard-won lessons I’ve had over the last few months doing it for keeps. It’s a skill that few people have, and which you might want to use carefully, but it’s super powerful when you need data you can see on a web page, have a reasonable legal right to, and can’t get from a comfortable and friendly programming API.