WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

Cory Miller Joins Post Status

I’m really excited to know that Cory Miller — you may know from a year of running a company called iThemes — is joining Brian Krogsgard at Post Status. While you might not know, Brian is one of the quiet pillars of the WordPress community. While he hasn’t always had everyone’s ear, he’s always had the attention of some of the most important people in the WordPress community.



Reusable Blocks in WordPress: How-to

There was (and still is) a lot of discussion of WordPress’s latest “Block” or “Gutenberg” editor. It’s still not the case that all WordPress sites have embraced the future it represents. (As I write this on WPShout in Jan 2020, I’m still using the “Classic” “Visual” or “TinyMCE” WordPress editor.) But one of the best features of the new WordPress editor is my focus today: reusable content blocks. Reusable block will make lots of small WordPress editing tasks better, I promise. Let’s get to how!


WordPress-adjacent Conferences for 2020

I really appreciated this list from Callie West of conferences for 2020 that may be of interest to WordPress developers. While I trust that her list isn’t exhaustive, it does cover all the big conferences that were on my mind for the year, and a few I’d never heard of. Which means her list is doing its job absolutely perfectly.




Getting to Know WP_Query

The WP_Query class is an exceptionally powerful tool in WordPress. As you may know, every WordPress site contains a database that stores many posts (of many post types) that make up the bulk of that site’s content, and WP_Query is the best way to fetch or retrieve a given selection of those posts for processing. So your theme files use it on regular basis, and a lot of plugins on your WordPress site will it.


How to Schedule Post Revisions in WordPress

We’ve covered before that you can schedule design changes to your site from the WordPress Customizer. A weird limitation, though, it that you can’t schedule revisions to posts (or pages, or other custom post types). Well, you can’t do that out-of-the-box. Which is where this here Quick Guide comes in: we’ll use a plugin to make it possible for you to schedule things like small updates to WordPress posts and pages to go live at a later time. Scheduling WordPress post revisions is a cool super power, and it’s great the PublishPress Revisions plugin makes it possible.