WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

Everything About Gutenberg Block Patterns

I admit I haven’t been following the concept and execution of Gutenberg Block Patterns very closely. Primarily this is because visual design has never been with a strong suit for me, nor (consequently) something I spent much time on. It is precisely for this reason that I’m so grateful for Birgit Pauli-Haack’s “WordPress Block Patterns Resource List.”



Never Test on Production Again!

I’ve somewhat intentionally given this little story about a new WordPress 5.5 feature a silly title. But as this story from Sarah Gooding over at the Tavern illustrates, people are already putting the new WordPress wp_get_environment_type() function to good use. And this story was doubly-interesting to me because I for one had no earthly idea that this new function existed. 😳


Using Query Monitor for Your Database Performance Optimization

The topics of SQL and database performance optimization are important to a small percentage of WordPress sites. But when they matter, they matter a whole heck of a lot. It is in those situations that the WordPress plugin Query Monitor comes in. Maintained by John Blackbourn, Query Monitor is a great way to see what database queries were run on specific page of your site, and find out what the slow ones are. Once you find that, you’ve still got some work to do—tracking down the problematic query’s source, fixing the code that produced the query, etc—and unfortunately that work is far outside the scope of this little Quick Guide. All that said, let’s cover the basics of how to start to understand what’s going on with the WordPress Query Monitor plugin.




Set Your WordPress Typography with Easy Google Fonts

Today I want to show off one of our favorite plugins here at WPShout. It’s all about making your site look great by giving you the right font, or if you’re fancy “typeface.” (I say that somewhat jokingly aware that there’s a distinction and that people care, but a little too far out of my depth to make the real distinction 🤪) Anyway the fun and useful typography plugin we’re showing off today if the WordPress plugin called “Easy Google Fonts.”


Amazing Weekly Web Dev Link-Collection, August 21 Edition

Over on her blog at Lireo Designs, Deborah Edwards-Onoro has been collecting an amazing array of great content about web design and development for while. And I had no earthly idea. It was only when I randomly noticed that she’d been sharing some great links on Twitter that Deborah let me know there was a whole lot more where that came from.


Pass Data to Template Files in WordPress 5.5+

I’m a sucker for small useful programmer features. While most of the WordPress peeps are chockablock with opinions on Gutenberg blocks vs PAGE BUILDER OF CHOICE, I just want you to know that you can now pass some variable around in your template files. If you’ve looked at the PHP files in a theme, you may be familiar with functions like get_template_part().