WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

Alain Schlesser on the Cost of Contribution

I’ve never really been someone who contributed to WordPress in a disciplined and direct way. (Which is to say, I’ve never had code I’ve written pulled into the WordPress project.) As a result, I can’t really say what the cognitive landscape of doing that is like. Which is precisely why I found this article from Alain Schlesser (best known to me for his work on WP-CLI) so interesting.



How to Find WordPress Post ID (no code!)

It’s not uncommon for a WordPress plugin (especially one developed for a small team of users) to rely on WordPress post IDs. If you’ve been around WordPress a lot, finding these numeric identifiers for the piece of content you’re wanting to control via WordPress post ID is easy. If not, this Quick Guide is for you. We’ll cover two different ways that when given a page on a WordPress site you control. First I’ll cover how to find the WordPress post ID with the web page’s HTML, then we’ll locate the numeric ID of the post by editing that post.


WordPress 5.3 Field Guide

WordPress just released today (Tuesday, Nov 12). If, like me, this release kind of snuck up on you, the first place to stop should be this WordPress 5.3 Field Guide. What it does very well is touch on all the more out-of-the-way features of the release with easy-to-access links so you can dig deeper into any particular topic where you feel particularly intrigued (or worried about some old code you wrote, etc).


2019 State of the Word

I didn’t attend WordCamp US this year, for the first time since it started. As such, I was eager and excited to watch the State of the Word, which is definitely the most attention-getting talk of the conference to me. Thankfully, it did get published quite quickly. It’s already on YouTube:


A Story of WP Option Autoload: A wp_options Cleanup

Today I want to dive into a kind of esoteric topic: WP option autoloading. It’s not something a lot of WordPress developers are likely to hit or to need. But vague knowledge of this topic saved me a bunch of time and confusion on a client project, so I want to help you understand how casual use of the update_option function without understanding WordPress’s autoload options feature can cause you pain and heartache.


See Your WordPress Scheduled Tasks

Sometimes, a developer will want to know why a WordPress site gets slow at a particular time, why their WP-Cron scheduled task isn’t working, or want to force one to run at off time. For all of these problems, the WP Crontrol plugin is the perfect tool. It’s a WordPress plugin to quickly debug your WP-Cron issues, all in one convenient place.


Smarter Handling of Large Images in WP 5.3

I was pleasantly surprised to learn about this WordPress 5.3 feature which in highlighted by Justin Ahinon on Make WordPress Core. The issue it’s meant to solve is an uncompressed 12 megapixel fresh-from-the-phone type of photo being comically too large for your WordPress site.


Changing in PHP 7.4

Now that WordPress is actively pushing the community and sites that run it toward more modern versions of PHP, it’s extra important to follow language changes. That’s where this summary of the most consequential features of the forthcoming PHP 7.4 for WordPress development form Jonathan Desrosiers comes in. He does a great job of quickly and approachably explaining all the features and changes that the language will bring.


Why You Should Use CSS Grid

CSS Grid is a very cool technology, and one I think more and more WordPress developers should both know about and use. While I’m hardly a CSS expert, that’s specifically why I feel well-qualified to tell you to learn CSS grid: if this non-expert can find it great and useful, surely it has arrived as a technology you must know.