WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

Chris Coyier on Learning WordPress Themes Now

For those who haven’t been knocking around the WordPress sphere for a long time, there’s a possibility that the name “Chris Coyier” and CSS-Tricks isn’t so well known. Chris is great, generous thoughtful guy, and if you’ve got a front-end interest at all, you really should be following CSS-Tricks. To a degree rare in the world CSS-Tricks is just a consistently useful, modest, and modern place to read about all the parts of WordPress development, CSS very much included (though hardly the only topic).



Apply to Speak at WordCamp US 2020

WordCamp Miami 2014

From the insular dream-world of COVID-19 Quarantines sweeping into new countries everyday, this feels a little strange to be talking about WordCamp US. The idea that at some point in the future I’ll eventually go to a place where hundred of people intentionally huddle together, shake hands, etc. But it used to happen once upon a time. And I’m guessing that it will again.


Using Gutenberg to Show Your Site’s Latest Posts on a Page

How do you show latest posts with Gutenberg? That’s what we’re here to answer. When I wanted this feature, it was so that my site’s “About” page would be able to list my latest posts. Back in 2007 or so, I more-or-less had to learn to program to get this working in WordPress. Now it’s as simple as finding the right block in the WordPress Gutenberg editor.


Block Dependent Themes

An interesting thing as Gutenberg grows is that it’s aiming to impact both WordPress themes and page builders. And to do this, we may need or want a way for a theme to say it required a specific Gutenberg block to function. I have not thought deeply about it, but I see that Mel Choyce is. So please consider and opine with her about this possibility. Here are two parts of her initial proposal:




Tinkerwell for WordPress

As someone who has been tracking both the WordPress world and the Laravel world for years, I was intrigued by Ross Wintle highlighting something I didn’t really know much about. (If I’m honest, it’s been about a year since I was dipping into Laravel regularly.)



Don’t Just Write WordPress Code

One of the first and most powerful lessons I learned while teaching myself to code a decade ago was to read/listen/watch widely. I believe it is one of the most powerful choices you can make in learning to code (or in almost any endeavor). Because broader minds (ones which have been exposed to more things) are often *way* better problem-solvers than narrower ones. Because the solution space they can conceive is just so much bigger. But that’s enough “David’s Life Philosophy” for now.