Category: Server Administration

How to Migrate your Site with All-in-One WP Migration

Migrating WordPress sites is a common and annoying task. Whether that’s between two different remote web servers, between a development server and production, or from production to local, there are lots of directions you migration might flow. All-in-One WP Migration remains the tool of choice for most of here on WPShout most of the time. It’s certainly one of the best free ways to move a WordPress site.



How to Find and Remove Large Files on cPanel Hosting

Most web hosting today will have some limitation on the amount of storage they’ll allow you. Maybe it’s 1GB or 20, but at some point, you’ll get near the border of using too much disk space. When you do, you’ll probably have some large files on a cPanel hosting account. And when that’s true, you’ll want to remove them to get back under your storage quota. But it’s not very clear or intuitive how.


Move a WordPress Site with the Duplicator Plugin

There are a lot of migration systems for WordPress. We’ve had lots of good experiences with All-in-One WP Migration. Some people swear by WP Migrate DB Pro. Others are partial to WP-CLI’s terminal-based systems. One of the few tools I’d never tried was Duplicator, but I recently did and I love it. I was very pleasantly surprised about a specific facet of it: I don’t need WordPress to get a new local copy of a remote WordPress site running on my local machine. You just pull down two files, put them in the same folder, and then you’re set. It’s great!



How to Disable File Editing in the Admin Area of WordPress

With WordPress 4.9, you now get a warning when you’re about to make a change in the file editors in the WordPress back-end. (For those not following, I’m talking about the editor that you can find at Appearance > Editor, or Plugins > Editor on most WordPress sites.) This is great first-step, and does end one of arguments for disallowing editing of files in the WordPress admin side of the site. That is: people won’t know what that they could break their site when they make changes on those pages.



How to Migrate a WordPress Site with WP-CLI and rsync

There are lots of ways to migrate a WordPress site. Lots of plugins can do it. You can do it over simple (S)FTP. But the quickest way I know of is via rsync and WP-CLI. But that does come with an important proviso: you need to have access to a shell (via a simple local terminal or SSH) to both ends of the migration. And that’s often harder to do than the plugin or SFTP route. But if you’ve got that, this way is a great deal faster.


Local WordPress Development: A Rundown of the Options

Local WordPress development in a sever room

One of the first and easiest “tests” that distinguishes established WordPress developers from those who are still getting into it is whether or not they’re using a remote server for development. You can build lots of WordPress sites before you need to have an alternate, personal place to experiment with theme and plugin code. But eventually everyone tries local development, and then they rarely go back to remote-only.


Deactivate a WordPress Plugin via FTP

The conventional method of turning off and on plugins in WordPress works 99.9% of the time. But sometimes, when you’re doing development work in a fast way (possibly “cowboy coding” in a sloppy way… :p), you’ll need to make plugin stop being loaded by WordPress in a different way. For that very small percentage case, it’s useful to know how to disable a plugin when you aren’t able to login to the admin area of a WordPress site. That’s where the (S)FTP hack we’ll cover today comes in.