WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes used to be a co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and being outdoors. He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

How to Enlarge an Image in WordPress (Lightboxes!)

Whether you’re writing about technical topics or something even more visually demanding like art, sometimes you just want to make a picture bigger in WordPress. That can mean a number of things, from how it appears on the page to what happens when you click it. We’ll shortly cover the first case, and then spend most of our time introducing using a “lightbox” from the Simple Lightbox plugin to make our images appear over our content in a large size when clicked.


Better Post Lists with CodePress Admin Columns

In this week’s Quick Guide we’re covering how to improve your “post lists” screens in WordPress. That is, we’re taking control the look of your “posts”, “pages”, etc lists by changing what appears in those columns. We’ll do that using that Admin Columns plugin (which was called CodePress Admin Columns until fairly recently 😉).


How to Edit the Author Slug in WordPress

Pen function |functional programming in WordPress

“Author archives” are one of a number of names you might call the page where WordPress shows your (as opposed to other authors’) posts. And by default WordPress will put the /author/ URL segment into your slug. Personally I think that’s a good name for it. But not everyone agrees, and that’s where the Edit Author Slug plugin comes in. In this Quick Guide we’ll explain how you can change your author page URL from example.com/author/david to example.com/this-person-rocks/david. If you want, of course. The point is that the whole middle section can be anything writer, ninja, queen-of-the-world.




Turn on Debugging in WordPress: WP_DEBUG

One could (and perhaps I should) write a whole course on “how to debug in WordPress.” This (unfortunately) isn’t that post, but rather a quick summary of the best first step in debugging WordPress. It is almost the one step you MUST take if you’d going to debug just about anything in WordPress: make sure WordPress is showing the errors by settings WP_DEBUG to true. This isn’t super complicated, but just an invaluable thing to know.



A WordPress LAMP?! An Introduction to WordPress Infrastructure

This article introduces one of the most foundation topics in WordPress development: the server-side software that makes WordPress work. Often referred to as “the stack,” as this article explains the “LAMP stack” that most WordPress sites run on is just an initalism of the software packages of Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. And that stack is just as useful today as it was 15 years ago when WordPress started.