Category: Back-End Development

WordPress’s get_template_part() function: What and Why

This article introduces an important concept in WordPress themes: the WordPress get_template_part function. It’s one of the many important concepts of WordPress theme development. Mastering WordPress theme development is an important milestone in understanding WordPress development more generally. (We have a full free course on the topic, check it out.)



The Four Languages You Must Know to Understand WordPress

WordPress Programming Language Book

Learning WordPress development starts with a lot of key questions, including this one: “What language is WordPress written in?” Another common one is “Should I learn PHP or JavaScript first?” WordPress programming languages is a big topic, but we’ll cover all you need to get started.




How to Use WordPress Conditional Tags

if is stormtrooper moonwalk | wordpress conditional tags

One of the most straightforward, dependable, and useful things in WordPress is what the Codex calls “Conditional Tags.” In her interview for Up and Running, Helen Hou-Sandí said WordPress conditional tags were her favorite WordPress functions for their simplicity and ease of use — they read just like English. We agree with her on that. They’re great. To explain them to you in more depth, we’re sharing a chapter of Up and Running here on WPShout. Let’s get to business understanding conditional tags in WordPress!


Is WordPress Object-Oriented? A Thorough Exploration

Here at WPShout, we’ve got some thorough tutorials on using object-orientation as a WordPress developer. We’ve hopefully convincingly explained that it’s pretty common and easy for a developer to write something when programming WordPress that is OO. Many many plugins you see are is essentially object-oriented WordPress plugins. What I want to explore today is a more esoteric question: Is WordPress an object-oriented system? Or, in short “Is WordPress OOP?”




Where and How to Use WordPress Hooks in Objects

You’ve maybe noted that we’ve recently been writing about WordPress and object-oriented programming in PHP a lot. Just last week, Fred published an article about PHP magic methods, especially __construct, and how they work. This week I want to tackle a very common and oft-debated question about WordPress and OOP: when I use WordPress hooks, where do they go on my objects?