WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.

Seasonal CSS

I love this little CSS stylesheet to give you a simple but pleasant little change of color on your site throughout the days of a year. James Stanley’s little project is a better-version of some of the first WordPress code I ever wrote, so the concept is very near to my heart.


How to Edit the Author Slug in WordPress

Pen function |functional programming in WordPress

“Author archives” are one of a number of names you might call the page where WordPress shows your (as opposed to other authors’) posts. And by default WordPress will put the /author/ URL segment into your slug. Personally I think that’s a good name for it. But not everyone agrees, and that’s where the Edit Author Slug plugin comes in. In this Quick Guide we’ll explain how you can change your author page URL from example.com/author/david to example.com/this-person-rocks/david. If you want, of course. The point is that the whole middle section can be anything writer, ninja, queen-of-the-world.



What’s new in PHP 8?

For those who don’t know, WordPress run on PHP on the server. This has been true for all of WordPress’s life, and remains so. For the most parts, this dependence on the PHP language has been an interesting tidbit. But in the next few weeks the next major version of PHP is coming out, and it’ll have a big impact.



Turn on Debugging in WordPress: WP_DEBUG

One could (and perhaps I should) write a whole course on “how to debug in WordPress.” This (unfortunately) isn’t that post, but rather a quick summary of the best first step in debugging WordPress. It is almost the one step you MUST take if you’d going to debug just about anything in WordPress: make sure WordPress is showing the errors by settings WP_DEBUG to true. This isn’t super complicated, but just an invaluable thing to know.


CSS Grid Generator

Frequent readers my recognize me as the not-great-at-CSS person here at WPShout. So for me, this Interactive CSS Grid Generator from Layoutit! is just such a welcome relief. I can (and have) learned all the different bits of markup and orders for different CSS grid properties. But I also ALWAYS have to look them up when I want to use them.Which one goes first? What’s that one actually called? All those sorts of questions.


An Overview of CDNs

If you’ve been around WordPress for long, you’ve likely heard of a “CDN.” A CDN, or content-delivery network, is one of the most common parts of speeding up a WordPress site, especially for visitors who are far away from where your site is hosted. But the way this works is often a blackbox to people I talk to. That’s where this great article over at web.dev from Katie Hempenius. She explains all the bits of CDNs I already knew, and much more beyond.



A WordPress LAMP?! An Introduction to WordPress Infrastructure

This article introduces one of the most foundation topics in WordPress development: the server-side software that makes WordPress work. Often referred to as “the stack,” as this article explains the “LAMP stack” that most WordPress sites run on is just an initalism of the software packages of Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP. And that stack is just as useful today as it was 15 years ago when WordPress started.