WordPress Articles from David Hayes

David B. Hayes is co-owner of WPShout. He's been using WordPress since 2007, and has a mature love (like an old married couple) for the content managment system. He's done loads of client work with it, uses it on a variety of personal projects, and generally thinks it's worth most people keeping it in their toolbox.

In addition to WordPress, he's into cycling, board games, and civic tech (running Code for Fort Collins). He also loves coffee and write about it at LowKeyCoffeeSnobs.com. And lastly (for this space) he writes about code beyond WordPress at Thoughtful Code.


Don’t Just Write WordPress Code

One of the first and most powerful lessons I learned while teaching myself to code a decade ago was to read/listen/watch widely. I believe it is one of the most powerful choices you can make in learning to code (or in almost any endeavor). Because broader minds (ones which have been exposed to more things) are often *way* better problem-solvers than narrower ones. Because the solution space they can conceive is just so much bigger. But that’s enough “David’s Life Philosophy” for now.



Even on PHP 7, WordPress is not “Modern PHP”

Our friend Carl Alexander wrote a (possibly) inflammatory but true argument for Delicious Brains this week. It reflects a lot of thoughts I’ve had as I’ve spent the last few years as one of the small minority of people trying to span the roles of  “WordPress” and “modern PHP” developer. In short, he’s said all I’ve thought in a fair, even handed, and useful way. While action is hardly guaranteed, helping to reach a public consensus about the state of WordPress PHP is the first step in evolving toward making it a modern PHP project (if that’s ever desired by enough of the right people, of course).


Working With WordPress User Roles and Capabilities

WordPress user roles

There are a few things that you must understand about user roles and capabilities to be an effective administrator of a WordPress site: things like what a user is, how you make a new one, and what you’d make users for. There’s lots of value in covering those things, but our goal today is to really get a solid understanding of how the whole WordPress user management and role system works conceptually, and to cover a few of the most important ways of modifying it.


We’re looking for Tech-Tutorial Authors

In 2020, Fred and I are prioritizing featuring writing from people other than ourselves on WPShout. If you’ve got an urge to write clear, useful, and interesting technical tutorials for the WPShout audience, this is the perfect opportunity for you. We’re still locking in all the details, but in short it’d likely be at most an article assignment per month, where you’ll write about 1500 words (ideally with some code snippets 🤓) about your favorite things in WordPress adjacent code.


Add a Map to WordPress with WP Google Maps

screenshot of WP Google Maps plugin page on WordPress.org

There are 1000 reasons you might want to show a map on your WordPress site. Everything from a one-time event that happened at a cool place you want to show off to the (probably more common) case where you want to help your site visitors find the physical, real-world location of your business. For all the reasons and more, you’ll likely need to install a WordPress plugin. For this Quick Guide, we’ll show you how to add a map to your WordPress site using the WP Google Maps plugin. (We’ve recommended this plugin for quite some time. Here’s Fred’s pointer to it from 2015. 🙃)


10up Actions from Quick Plugin Deploy from Github

If there’s one problem that developers have with the WordPress.org Plugin (and Theme) directories, it’s most likely to be that the process of deploying the Subversion repositories used by that site is annoying, complicated, and cumbersome. I’ve been looking for a solution for a while, and this (pre-Christmas 🙃) post from Helen Hou-Sandi has me really excited for 10up and Github’s new “Actions” feature.


Cory Miller Joins Post Status

I’m really excited to know that Cory Miller — you may know from a year of running a company called iThemes — is joining Brian Krogsgard at Post Status. While you might not know, Brian is one of the quiet pillars of the WordPress community. While he hasn’t always had everyone’s ear, he’s always had the attention of some of the most important people in the WordPress community.