Link Category: Ideas

Hack at Slack

There are a number of different reasons I wanted to share this article about the programming language “Hack” here on Shout. The first one is just that I found it an interesting and pleasant conversation of the use and benefit of the (poorly named) PHP-like language that arrived in the world when Facebook’s PHP performance bottlenecks started to bother them too much.


Block Dependent Themes

An interesting thing as Gutenberg grows is that it’s aiming to impact both WordPress themes and page builders. And to do this, we may need or want a way for a theme to say it required a specific Gutenberg block to function. I have not thought deeply about it, but I see that Mel Choyce is. So please consider and opine with her about this possibility. Here are two parts of her initial proposal:



Don’t Just Write WordPress Code

One of the first and most powerful lessons I learned while teaching myself to code a decade ago was to read/listen/watch widely. I believe it is one of the most powerful choices you can make in learning to code (or in almost any endeavor). Because broader minds (ones which have been exposed to more things) are often *way* better problem-solvers than narrower ones. Because the solution space they can conceive is just so much bigger. But that’s enough “David’s Life Philosophy” for now.


Even on PHP 7, WordPress is not “Modern PHP”

Our friend Carl Alexander wrote a (possibly) inflammatory but true argument for Delicious Brains this week. It reflects a lot of thoughts I’ve had as I’ve spent the last few years as one of the small minority of people trying to span the roles of  “WordPress” and “modern PHP” developer. In short, he’s said all I’ve thought in a fair, even handed, and useful way. While action is hardly guaranteed, helping to reach a public consensus about the state of WordPress PHP is the first step in evolving toward making it a modern PHP project (if that’s ever desired by enough of the right people, of course).



Alain Schlesser on the Cost of Contribution

I’ve never really been someone who contributed to WordPress in a disciplined and direct way. (Which is to say, I’ve never had code I’ve written pulled into the WordPress project.) As a result, I can’t really say what the cognitive landscape of doing that is like. Which is precisely why I found this article from Alain Schlesser (best known to me for his work on WP-CLI) so interesting.



Easier Lazy Loading (for Chrome)

So, Chome 76 (or later. But what version of Chrome am I running anyway?) is getting a feature that would have saved me at least a little work on a few client projects. That is, it’s making lazy-loading of images and iframes as easy as: