Difficulty: Intermediate


How to Use get_the_author_meta in WordPress to Show Author Info

Your author’s are the heart of most WordPress sites. They write your content, engage with your audience, and generally make the site work as it should. As such, you’ll often want to get WP author meta from the site so that you can show it off in your template. The way to get meta author tag information from WordPress is a handy function called get_the_author_meta (or, if you don’t need to do any processing, the_author_meta). Using this function is a great way to get the author meta fields from your WordPress users, and show those author fields in your WordPress theme templates.



How to Audit User Behavior with a WordPress Activity Log

In the Quick Guide we’ll use WP Security Audit Log to keep an activity log of what’s happening on our WordPress site. Activity logs are a chronological list of records of what logged in users did on your WordPress sites and multisite networks. A WordPress activity log a vital part of site security and management because in them, you can find a user log full of information about user logins—from where they logged in and when, what content they have created, published, modified and deleted, what user profile and WordPress settings changes other administrators have done, and much more.


How to Submit WordPress Posts from the Frontend

You might want add new posts without having to log into the WordPress dashboard, or maybe allow your visitors a way to submit content of their own. You can do it. Figuring out how to submit a post from the front end is straightforward. In this article, we’ll cover a few ways you can create a new post form and save its results into a real, live WordPress post.




How to Reset Your WordPress Password with cPanel and phpMyAdmin

wordpress change password cpanel

In this Quick Guide, we’ll walk you through how to reset a WordPress user’s password using cPanel and phpMyAdmin. To change WordPress passwords from cPanel is simple (it takes less than a minute front-to-back) and it’s a very useful trick to know—one we use at least a couple times every single month in our work with our clients.



How to Enable Two Step Authentication in WordPress with iThemes Security Pro

Strong passwords are good for WordPress security, but they aren’t always enough. Especially if your password is one you reuse across many sites (but even if not), you’ll sometimes want to consider a two-step authentication in WordPress. That means that you’ll first fill in your WordPress password, and after that is filled in, you’ll be prompted for another code. Most often, this is a 6-digit number which changes every thirty seconds. Most people have probably experienced a 2-Factor Authentication flow (via a phone SMS message) of this kind from their bank or Facebook account.